The Fairest Flower of Womankind

by Lindsay Straw

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about

Traditional songs of feminine triumph

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released April 28, 2017

All songs are traditional, with arrangements by the artists on each track.

Lindsay Straw: Vocals (all tracks), Guitar (tracks, 2, 5, 6), Bouzouki (1, 3, 8, 10, 12)
Daniel Accardi: Fiddle (9), Accordion (3, 11)
Armand Aromin: Fiddle (3, 8, 10), Harmony Vocals (13)
Benedict Gagliardi: Concertina (3, 10, 13), Harmonica (8), Harmony Vocals (13)
Owen Marshall: Guitar (1, 6, 7, 8), Harmonium (7, 8)

Recorded, mixed and mastered by James Prendergast at Mill Pond Music Studio in Portsmouth, NH
Cover art by Amandine Comte (L'art Comme Unique)
Design and layout by Salt Design - Portland, ME
Back cover photo by Joni Lohr

This CD was financed in part by Club Passim's Iguana Music Fund and by my very generous Kickstarter backers.

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Lindsay Straw Boston, Massachusetts

Boston-based traditional folk singer, guitarist & bouzouki player.

"Hearken(s) back to more innocent times, of Greenwich Village and pure folk." - The Living Tradition

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Track Name: The Forester
“I’m a forester in this wood and you’re the same design,
It’s the mantle of your maidenhead, bonny lassie, will be mine.”
He took her by the milk-white hand and he laid her on the ground,
And when he had the will of her, he let her up again.
Singing di-dee-eye-oh, sing fa-la-doh, sing di-dee-eye-oh, ah-yay.

“Well, now you’ve let me down, now come pick me up again;
Now that you’ve had the will of me, come tell to me your name.”
“Sometimes they call me John,” he said,
“and sometimes they call me James,
But when I’m in the king’s high court, Sweet William is my name.”
Singing di-dee-eye-oh, sing fa-la-doh, sing di-dee-eye-oh, ah-yay.

Then he jumped up on his milk white steed
and straightway he did ride;
She’s buckled up her petticoats and after him she flies.
He never was so kind to say, “Lassie, will you ride?”
And neither did she ever say, “Oh, laddie, will you bide?”
Singing di-dee-eye-oh, sing fa-la-doh, sing di-dee-eye-oh, ah-yay.

He’s run and she’s run the long summer day,
Till they’ve come unto the water that was called the River Tay.
He plunged his steed into the ford and straightway through he ran;
She set her feet into the stream and like an otter swam.
Singing di-dee-eye-oh, sing fa-la-doh, sing di-dee-eye-oh, ah-yay.

She came unto the king’s castle and twirled all on the pin;
Who was it but the king himself to let the lassie in?
“What is your will with me, fair maid, what is your will with me?”
“There is a man within your court this day has robbed me.”
Singing di-dee-eye-oh, sing fa-la-doh, sing di-dee-eye-oh, ah-yay.

“Well, did he steal your mantle or did he steal your fee?
Or did he steal your maidenhead, the flower of your body?”
“No, he neither stole my mantle and he neither stole my fee,
But he stole my maidenhead, the flower of my body.”
Singing di-dee-eye-oh, sing fa-la-doh, sing di-dee-eye-oh, ah-yay.

“If he be a married man, high hanged he will be,
But if he be a single man, his body I’ll grant to thee.”
“Sometimes they call him John,” she said,
“and sometimes they call him James,
But when he’s here within your court Sweet William is his name.”
Singing di-dee-eye-oh, sing fa-la-doh, sing di-dee-eye-oh, ah-yay.

“There’s not a William in my court, not only one but three,
And one of them is the Queen’s brother and I’ll laugh if it is he.”
The king has called his merry men all by thirty and by three;
Sweet William used to be the first but now the last came he.
Singing di-dee-eye-oh, sing fa-la-doh, sing di-dee-eye-oh, ah-yay.

“Oh, will you marry the bonny lass, or hanged will you be?”
“I’d rather marry the bonny lass than hang from the gallows tree.”
But he took out a purse of gold all locked within a glove;
“Take this now, my bonny lass, and go seek another love.”

“I won’t take your gold,” she said, “nor any of your fee,
But I will have your own body that the king has granted me.”
He said, “I wish I drunk the water and never drunk the wine,
Than to have a shepherd’s daughter to be a love of mine.”
Singing di-dee-eye-oh, sing fa-la-doh, sing di-dee-eye-oh, ah-yay.

“Maybe I’m a shepherd’s girl, or maybe I am not,
But you could have ridden all on your way and left me on my own.
But I dare say a better match could have scarcely paired together,
Than the king of France’s own daughter
and the queen of Scotland’s brother.”
Singing di-dee-eye-oh, sing fa-la-doh, sing di-dee-eye-oh, ah-yay.
Singing di-dee-eye-oh, sing fa-la-doh, sing di-dee-eye-oh, ah-yay.
Track Name: The Maid on the Shore
Well, it’s of a sea captain who sailed on the salt sea,
And the moon it shone gentle and clear, oh.
“I’ll die, I’ll die,” this captain did cry,
“If I can’t have that maid who walks on the shore,
If I can’t have that maid on the shore.”

“Well, it’s I have got silver and I have got gold,
And plenty of costly fine ware, oh.
And I’ll give half to you, all my gallant young crew,
If you fetch me that girl who walks on the shore,
If you fetch me that maid on the shore.”

So the sailors they got them a very long boat,
And straight for the shore they did steer, oh.
Saying, “Ma’am, if you please, won’t you enter on board,
To view a fine cargo of costly ware,
To view a fine cargo of ware.”

With much persuading, they got her on board,
And the moon it shone gentle and clear, oh.
She sat herself down at the stern of the boat,
And back for the ship, the young sailors did steer,
And back for the ship they did steer.

And when they a-rowed alongside of the ship,
The captain he spat out his chew, oh.
Saying, “First you will lie in my arms all this night,
And then I’ll give you to my jolly young crew,
Then I’ll give you to my crew.”

“Oh, thank you, oh, thank you, this young maid,” she cried,
“That’s just what I’ve been waiting for, oh.
For I’ve grown so weary of my maidenhead,
As I walked all alone on my rocky old shore,
And walked all alone on my shore.”

So she sat herself down in the stern of the ship,
And the moon it shone gentle and clear.
She sang so sweet, so neat and complete,
She sang sailors and captain right fast to sleep,
She sang sailors and captain asleep.

Then she robbed him of silver, she robbed him of gold;
She plundered that costly fine ware, oh.
The captains broadsword she’s took for an oar,
And she’s paddled right back to her rocky old shore,
Yes, she’s paddled right back to the shore.

“Oh, were my men drunk, or were my men mad?
Or were they sunk deep in despair, oh?
That they let her away with her beauty so gay?”
How the sailors all wished that that sweet maid was there,
How the sailors all wished she was there.

“No, your men they weren’t drunk,
and your men they weren’t mad,
And neither sunk deep in despair.
But I deluded your crew and likewise yourself, too, captain;
Now I’m a maid on my rocky old shore,
I’m a maiden once more on the shore.”
Track Name: The Female Rambling Sailor
Come all you maidens far and near, and listen to my ditty;
It was near Gravesend there lived a maid,
she was both young and pretty.
Her true love he was pressed away, and drowned in a foreign sea,
Which caused this fair maid for to say, “I’ll be a rambling sailor.”

In her jacket blue and trousers white,
just like a sailor neat and tight;
Sure the sea it was the heart’s delight of the female rambling sailor.
When in storm upon the raging sea, she was ready at her station;
Her mind was as calm as calm could be - she loved her occupation.

When in the calm, this damsel young,
she charmed the sailors with her tongue,
And she walked the deck and sweetly sung,
did the female rambling sailor.
This maiden gay a wager lay, she would go aloft like any;
From stem to stern she freely went,
where times she had been many.

From stem to stern she freely goes,
she braves all dangers, fears no foes,
And soon you’ll hear of the overthrow
of the female rambling sailor.
From stem to stern she freely went,
where times she had been many;
Her hold it slipped and down she fell
and calmly bid this world farewell.

When a snowy white breast in sight it came,
it appeared to be a female frame,
And Rebecca Young it was the name of the female rambling sailor.
Come all you maidens far and near, and listen to my story;
Her body’s anchored in the ground, let’s hope her soul’s in glory.

May the willows wave around her grave
and around the laurels planted.
May the roses sweet grow at the feet
of the one who was undaunted.
On the river Fame she was known well,
few sailors there could her excel;
One tear let fall for the last farewell of the female rambling sailor.
Track Name: Basket of Eggs
Down in Sandbank fields, two sailors they were walking,
Their pockets were both lined with gold.
And as together they were talking,
A fair maid there they did behold.
With a little basket standing by her,
As she sat down to take her ease.
To carry it for her, one of them offered;
The answer was: “Sir, if you please.”

One of these sailors, he picked up the basket;
“There’s eggs in the basket, please take care;
And if by chance you should outwalk me,
At the halfway house, please leave them there.”
Behold these sailors they did outwalk her;
The halfway house they did pass by.
This pretty damsel she laughed at their fancy,
And on these sailors she kept her eye.

When these two sailors came unto an alehouse,
There they did call for a pint of wine.
Saying: “Landlord, oh, landlord, what fools in this nation,
This young maid from her eggs we’ve twined.”
“Oh, landlord, oh, landlord, bring us some bacon,
We’ve got these eggs and we’ll have some dressed.”
Behold these sailors were much mistaken,
As you shall say when you hear the rest.

Twas then the landlord he went up to the basket,
Expecting of some eggs to find.
He said, ‘Young man, oh, young man, you’re much mistaken,
Instead of eggs, sure, I’ve found a child.”
Then one of them sat down to weeping,
The other said: “It’s not worthwhile.
Here’s fifty guineas I’ll give to the baby,
If any woman will take the child.”

This pretty damsel she sat by the fire,
She had a shawl drawn o’er her face.
She said: “I’ll take it and I’ll kindly use it,
When first I see that the money is paid.”
One of these sailors, he threw down the money,
Great favor to the babe was shown.
“Since it is so, then let’s be friendly,
For this child it is mine and it’s your own.”

“Don’t you remember dancing with Nancy,
As long ago as last Easter day?”
“Oh, yes, I do, and she pleased my fancy,
So now the fiddler I have paid.”
This young sailor went up to the basket,
He looked at the babe, his heart full sore.
“Since it is so, may we all be contented,
But I’ll be damned if I like eggs anymore.”
Track Name: Fair Annie
“It’s narrow, narrow, make your bed and learn to lie alone;
For I’m going over the sea, fair Annie, a fine bride to bring home.
A fine bride to bring home, fair Anne, with gold, and gear and name;
For I took you as a waif woman, now I’ll leave you as the same.”

“But who will bake my bridal bread, and who’ll brew my bridal ale?
And who will welcome my brisk young bride that I bring o’er the dale?”
“When you come o’er the dale,” she said, “I’ll host your feast that night,
And I will welcome your brisk young bride, although it does me slight.”

She’s taken her young son in her arms and another by the hand,
And she is up to the highest tower to see him come to land.
“Come see him come to land, my son, look o’er yon sea strand;
Come see your father’s brisk young bride before she comes to land.”

“You’re welcome to your house, Lord Tom, you’re welcome to your land;
You’re welcome with your fair lady that you lead by the hand.
I’ll lead you by the hand, lady, over to your bowers;
You’re welcome to your house, lady, all that’s here is yours.”

“I thank thee, Annie, I thank thee, Annie, so dearly I thank thee;
You’re the likest to my sister that ever I did see.
For never did I see the knight that stole my sister away;
Oh, shame on him and his company and the land where’er he stay.”

When bells were rung and mass was sung, and all were bound for bed,
She watched as Thomas and his bride to their chamber they were led.
As to their chamber they were led, she sat down to harp them to sleep,
And as she harped and as she sang, full sorely she did weep.

“My gown is on,” said the brisk young bride, “my shoes are on my feet,
I will go to Annie’s room and see what makes her weep.
What makes you weep, my Fair Annie, why make you such a moan?”
“It’s for the gold Lord Thomas wants, for I can give him none.”

“Who was your father, Fair Annie, do you know who your mother was?”
“King Easter was my father dear, the queen my mother was.”
“The queen my mother was also, my father King Easter, too,
So it shall not be for lack of gold that your love shall part from you.”

“For I myself have seven ships all loaded to the brim,
And I will give them all to you and to your seven children.
You and your seven children, Lord Thomas shall not leave alone,
And thanks to all the powers in heaven, I go a maiden home.”
Track Name: Geordie
There was a battle in the north, and nobles there were many,
And they have killed Sir Charlie Hay, and laid the blame on Geordie.

Oh, he has written a long letter and sent it to his lady,
You must come up to Edinburgh town and see the news of Geordie.

When first she looked the letter on, she was both red and rosy;
She had not read a word but one when she grew pale as a lily.

“Go fetch to me my good grey steed, my men shall all go with me;
For I shall neither eat nor drink, till Edinburgh town shall see me.”

And she has mounted her good grey steed, her men they all went with her,
And she did neither eat nor drink till Edinburgh town did see her.

At first appeared the fatal block, and then the axe to head him,
And Geordie coming down the stairs with bars of iron upon him.

Though he was chained in fetters strong, of iron and steel so heavy,
There’s not a one in all the court was so fine a man as Geordie.

Now she’s down on her bended knee, I’m sure she’s pale and weary.
“Oh, pardon, pardon, noble king, and give me back my dearie,
Oh, give me back my dearie.”

“I have born him seven sons, the eighth is in my body;
Oh, pardon, pardon, noble king, and pity a woeful lady,
Oh, pity a woeful lady.”

“Go tell the heading man make haste,” our king replied full loudly.
“Oh, noble king, take all that’s mine, but give me back my Geordie,
Oh, give me back my Geordie.”

The Gordons came and the Gordons ran,they were stark and steady,
And all the word among them all was, Gordons, keep you ready.

An aged lord at the king’s right hand says, “Noble king, but hear me;
Let her count out five thousand pounds and give her back her dearie.”

Some gave her marks, some gave her crowns, some gave her dollars many;
She’s counted out five thousand pounds and gotten again her dearie.

She’s blinked blithely in Geordie’s face, says, “Dear, I’ve bought thee, Geordie,
But the blood would have flowed all on the green before I lost my laddie,
Before I lost my laddie.”

He took her by the middle small and he kissed her lips so rosy;
“The fairest flower of womankind is my sweet bonny lady.”
Track Name: Young Beichan, Part One
Part One:

Young Beichan was a noble lord, and a peer of high degree;
He took a ship from London town for that Christ’s tomb he would see.

He sailed west and he sailed east, until he came to Proud Turkey,
Where he was cast in prison strong and treated most cruelly.

Now in that prison there grew a tree; it grew so stout, it grew so strong.
He was chained all up by the middle until his life was almost gone.

The Turk he had a daughter fair, never fairer did man see;
She stole the keys to her father’s prison, Young Beichan for to set free.

“Oh, if a lady would save me, at her stirrup foot I would run;
Or if a widow would rescue me, oh, I would swear to be her son.”

“And if a virgin would save me, I would wed her with a ring;
I’d give her halls, I’d give her bowers, I would love her above all thing.”

O, barefoot, barefoot, she went out, and barefoot, barefoot she came in;
It was not for want of hose and shoes but for fear of making din.

And when she saw Young Beichan, her heart it felt most wondrous sore,
For all the mice and the cruel rats had eaten off his yellow hair.

She gave him a razor for his beard, and a comb for his yellow hair;
Five hundred pound into his pocket for to spend and not to spare.

“Go set your foot on good shipboard, and make haste to your own country,
And before three years are past and gone, it’s well-married we shall be.”

He had not been in his own country not a twelve month till an end,
But he must marry a famed earl’s daughter or else lose all of his land.

“Oh, no alas!” cries Young Beichan, “I know not what I will do,
For I cannot reach my Lady Isabel and she cannot come to me.”

Oh, it fell once about that time, Fair Isabel lay asleep,
When up there starts the Billy Blin that slept all at her bed feet.

“Wake up, wake up, Fair Isabel, how can you sleep so sound?
When today it is Beichan’s wedding day, all upon the English ground?”

“Now go you to your mother’s bower, and think it neither sin nor shame,
But take you two of your mother’s ladies, for to keep you from all blame.”

“Then dress yourself in the red scarlet, and your ladies in dainty green,
And put a girdle about your middle that were fit for any queen.”

Then go you down by yon seaside, and down by the sea-strand,
So bonny will the Holland boats come rowing all to your hand.

Then set your milk-white foot aboard and cry you, “Hail ye, Domine!”
And I shall be the steerer of it, to row you over the sea.

***
Part Two:

She came full soon to Young Beichan’s gate and she heard the fiddlers play,
Then well she knew from all she heard it was his wedding day.

She’s put her hand in her pocket and took out guineas three,
“Here take you this, you proud porter, and bid the bridegroom speak to me.”

And when he came all up the stair, he bowed to his bended knee,
“Rise up, rise up, you proud porter, what meaneth this courtesy?”

“Oh, I have been porter at these gates, it’s thirty years and three,
But there’s a lady at them now, her like I never did see.”

“For she is dressed in red scarlet and her ladies in dainty green,
She has a girdle about her middle that were fit for any queen.”

“On every finger she has a ring and on the middle she has three,
There’s as much gold all about her brow would buy an earldom for me.”

Then up it starts him, Young Beichan, and he swears by Our Lady,
“It can be none but my Fair Isabel come o’er the flood to see me.”

Oh, quickly ran he down the stairs, of fifteen made but three;
He’s taken Isabel all in his arms and kissed her most tenderly.

“Oh, have you forgotten, Young Beichan, the vow you made to me,
When I took you out of the prison strong, and helped you over the sea.”

“Oh, have you taken another bride, have you forgotten about me?
Though I stole the keys to the prison door and gave you your liberty.”

She looked over her left shoulder to hide the tears all in her eye;
“Now fare thee well, my false love, and I’ll think no more on thee.”

“Take home your daughter, madam,” says he, “with all my lands to be her fee;
For I must marry my truest love that gave me life and liberty.”

“Is this the custom of your house,” says she, ”or the fashion of your town?
To marry a maid on a May morning and send her back before it’s noon?”
Track Name: Young Beichan, Part Two
Part One:

Young Beichan was a noble lord, and a peer of high degree;
He took a ship from London town for that Christ’s tomb he would see.

He sailed west and he sailed east, until he came to Proud Turkey,
Where he was cast in prison strong and treated most cruelly.

Now in that prison there grew a tree; it grew so stout, it grew so strong.
He was chained all up by the middle until his life was almost gone.

The Turk he had a daughter fair, never fairer did man see;
She stole the keys to her father’s prison, Young Beichan for to set free.

“Oh, if a lady would save me, at her stirrup foot I would run;
Or if a widow would rescue me, oh, I would swear to be her son.”

“And if a virgin would save me, I would wed her with a ring;
I’d give her halls, I’d give her bowers, I would love her above all thing.”

O, barefoot, barefoot, she went out, and barefoot, barefoot she came in;
It was not for want of hose and shoes but for fear of making din.

And when she saw Young Beichan, her heart it felt most wondrous sore,
For all the mice and the cruel rats had eaten off his yellow hair.

She gave him a razor for his beard, and a comb for his yellow hair;
Five hundred pound into his pocket for to spend and not to spare.

“Go set your foot on good shipboard, and make haste to your own country,
And before three years are past and gone, it’s well-married we shall be.”

He had not been in his own country not a twelve month till an end,
But he must marry a famed earl’s daughter or else lose all of his land.

“Oh, no alas!” cries Young Beichan, “I know not what I will do,
For I cannot reach my Lady Isabel and she cannot come to me.”

Oh, it fell once about that time, Fair Isabel lay asleep,
When up there starts the Billy Blin that slept all at her bed feet.

“Wake up, wake up, Fair Isabel, how can you sleep so sound?
When today it is Beichan’s wedding day, all upon the English ground?”

“Now go you to your mother’s bower, and think it neither sin nor shame,
But take you two of your mother’s ladies, for to keep you from all blame.”

“Then dress yourself in the red scarlet, and your ladies in dainty green,
And put a girdle about your middle that were fit for any queen.”

Then go you down by yon seaside, and down by the sea-strand,
So bonny will the Holland boats come rowing all to your hand.

Then set your milk-white foot aboard and cry you, “Hail ye, Domine!”
And I shall be the steerer of it, to row you over the sea.

***
Part Two:

She came full soon to Young Beichan’s gate and she heard the fiddlers play,
Then well she knew from all she heard it was his wedding day.

She’s put her hand in her pocket and took out guineas three,
“Here take you this, you proud porter, and bid the bridegroom speak to me.”

And when he came all up the stair, he bowed to his bended knee,
“Rise up, rise up, you proud porter, what meaneth this courtesy?”

“Oh, I have been porter at these gates, it’s thirty years and three,
But there’s a lady at them now, her like I never did see.”

“For she is dressed in red scarlet and her ladies in dainty green,
She has a girdle about her middle that were fit for any queen.”

“On every finger she has a ring and on the middle she has three,
There’s as much gold all about her brow would buy an earldom for me.”

Then up it starts him, Young Beichan, and he swears by Our Lady,
“It can be none but my Fair Isabel come o’er the flood to see me.”

Oh, quickly ran he down the stairs, of fifteen made but three;
He’s taken Isabel all in his arms and kissed her most tenderly.

“Oh, have you forgotten, Young Beichan, the vow you made to me,
When I took you out of the prison strong, and helped you over the sea.”

“Oh, have you taken another bride, have you forgotten about me?
Though I stole the keys to the prison door and gave you your liberty.”

She looked over her left shoulder to hide the tears all in her eye;
“Now fare thee well, my false love, and I’ll think no more on thee.”

“Take home your daughter, madam,” says he, “with all my lands to be her fee;
For I must marry my truest love that gave me life and liberty.”

“Is this the custom of your house,” says she, ”or the fashion of your town?
To marry a maid on a May morning and send her back before it’s noon?”
Track Name: The Outlandish Knight
An outlandish knight came from the north land,
And he came courting me;
He said he would take me to foreign lands,
And there he would marry me, me, me;
And there he would marry me.

“Go fetch me some of your father’s gold,
And some of your mother’s fee,
And two of the best steeds from out of the stable,
Where there stand thirty and three, three, three;
Where there stand thirty and three.”

She mounted all on her lily white steed,
And he on a dapple grey.
They rode till they came unto the seaside,
Three hours before it was day, was day;
Three hours before it was day.

“Light off, light off, your lily white steed,
Deliver it up unto me;
For six pretty maidens have I drowned here,
And the seventh thou shall be, shall be;
Oh, the seventh thou shall be.”

“And doff off, doff off, your silken things,
Deliver them up unto me;
I think they look too rich and too gay,
To rot all in the salt sea, salt sea;
To rot all in the salt sea.”

“If I must doff off my silken things,
Pray turn your back unto me;
For it is not fitting that such a young man,
A naked maiden should see, should see;
A naked maiden should see.”

“And cut thou away the brambles sharp,
The brambles from off of the brim,
That they may not tangle my curly locks,
Nor scratch my lily white skin, white skin;
Nor scratch my lily white skin.”

He turned around his back unto her,
And he’s bent down over the brim.
She’s caught him around his middle so small,
And she’s flung him all into the stream, the stream;
She flung him all into the stream.

Well, he fell high, and he fell low,
Until he came to the side.
“Catch hold of my hand, my pretty fair maid,
And I will make you my bride, my bride;
Oh, I will make you my bride.”

“Lie there, lie there, you false-hearted man,
Lie there instead of me.
For six pretty maidens have you drowned here,
But the seventh has drowned thee, drowned thee;
The seventh has drowned thee.”
Track Name: The Crafty Maid's Policy/Fingal's Cave (strathspey)/Sheepskins & Beeswax (reel)
Come listen awhile and I’ll sing you a song,
Of three merry gentlemen riding along.
They met a fair maid and to her did say,
“We’re afraid this cold morning will do you some harm.”

“Oh, no, kind sirs, I’m afraid you’re mistaken,
To think this cold morning will do me some harm.
But there’s one thing I crave, which lies twixt your legs,
And if you give me that, it will keep me warm.”

“Well, since you do crave it, my dear, you shall have it,
If you’ll come with me to yonder green tree.
And since you do crave it, my dear, you shall have it,
And I’ll make these two gentlemen witness to be.”

So, the gentleman lighted and straightway she mounted,
And looking the gentleman hard in the face,
Saying, “You knew not my meaning; you wrong understood me.”
And away she went galloping down the long lane.

Come, gentlemen, lend me one of your horses,
That I may ride after her down the long lane.
If I overtake her, I warrant I’ll make her,
Return unto me my own horse again.

But when this fair maid, she saw him a-coming,
She instantly then took a pistol in hand,
Saying, “Doubt not my skill or that you I would kill;
I’d have you stand back or you are a dead man.”

“Oh, why do you spend your time here in talking?
Why do you spend your time here in vain?
Come give her a guinea; it’s what she deserves.
And I warrant she’ll give you your horse back again.”

“Oh, no, kind sirs, you’re vastly mistaken,
If it is his loss, well, it is my gain.
And you were a witness that he gave it to me.”
And away she went galloping over the plain.
Track Name: William Taylor
I’ll sing you a song about two young lovers,
‘Twas from Lindsfield town they came.
The young man's name was William Taylor,
The young woman’s name was Sarah Jane.

Oh, William Taylor’s a nice young sailor;
He went courting a lady gay.
And just as they were going to be married,
Pretty William sailed away, oh,
Pretty William sailed away.

She’s dressed herself in sailor’s clothing,
Sailor’s clothing she did put on;
She’s gone to seek her own true lover,
For to find him she has gone.

On the ship there was a battle,
She fought there with all the rest;
Her jacket burst her silver buttons,
There appeared her snow white breast, oh,
There appeared her snow white breast.

Then the captain he stepped up to her,
Asked her what had brought her here.
“I’ve come to seek my own dear lover,
Who was pressed the other year.”

“If you’ve come to seek your lover,
Pray tell to me what is his name.”
“His name it is bold William Taylor,
And from Lindsfield town he came, oh,
And from Lindsfield town he came.”

“If his name be William Taylor,
William Taylor he is not here;
He’s lately married a rich young lady,
Worth ten thousand pounds a year.

But rise you early in the morning,
Early at the break of day;
There you’ll find bold William Taylor,
Walking with his lady gay, oh,
Walking with his lady gay.”

Then she called for a sword and pistol,
A sword and pistol she did command;
She bide and shot bold William Taylor,
With his bride at his right hand.

Then our captain was well-pleased;
He was quite pleased with what she had done.
Soon she became a bold commander,
Over the captain and his men, oh,
Over the captain and his men.
Track Name: Sweet Lovely Joan
A story to you I will relate,
Concerning of a pretty maid;
Concerning of sweet lovely Joan,
As she sat milking all alone.

A noble knight he rode with speed,
All mounted on his milk-white steed;
He rode, he rode himself alone
Until he came to lovely Joan.

“Good morning to you, my pretty maid,”
“And twice good morning, sir,” she said.
“Oh, are you milking all alone?”
“Oh, yes, oh, yes,” said lovely Joan.

Then out he pulled his purse of gold
And said, “Fair maid, do this behold,
All this I’ll give if me you’ll wed,”
Her cheeks they blushed like roses red.

“Oh, noble knight, pray you forbear,
I cannot marry you, I swear;
For on tomorrow I’m to wed,
My own, my own, true love instead.”

‘Twas then he made her a solemn vow,
That he would have her, yes or no.
But this he said to frighten Joan
As she sat milking all alone.

“Give me the gold, sir, into my hand,
And I will be at your command;
For that will be more good to me
Than twenty husbands, sir,” said she.

As he was looking across the mead,
She’s mounted on his milk-white steed;
He called, he called, ‘twas all in vain,
She never once looked back again.

She did not feel that she was safe,
Until she’d reached her true love’s gate;
She’d robbed him of his steed and gold,
And left him an empty purse to hold.

It pleased her lover to his heart
To see how well she’d played her part;
“Tomorrow morning we’ll be wed,
And I will be the knight instead.”
Track Name: Blow Away the Morning Dew
There was a brisk young farmer, kept sheep upon the hill,
And he went out of a May morning to see what he could kill.
He gazed high and he gazed low, he gave an underlook,
And there he saw a lady fair a-bathing in the brook.

Chorus:
Oh, it’s aye, the dewy morning, blow the winds aye-oh,
Blow the winds of a dew morning, how sweet the winds do blow.

“It’s fitter for young ladies to be sewing their silken seams,
Than it is to be out on a May morning a-swimming against the stream.”
“It’s fitter for young farmers to mind their own at home,
Than it is to be out on a May morning to watch young ladies swim!”

Chorus

“Oh, do not touch my mantle, and leave my clothes alone,
But take me out of the water and carry me to my home.
Oh, take me to my father’s house and you may sit me down,
And you shall have my maiden head and fifteen hundred pounds.”

Chorus

Now when she came to her father’s gate, she knocked all at the pin;
None was so ready as the waiting maid to let this fair maid in.
Now when the gate was open, so nimbly she turned about,
Saying, “Here I am a maid within, and you’re a fool without!”

Chorus

“There is a cock in father’s barn, he never trod a hen,
He flies about and flutters his wings, and I think you’re one of them.
There is an herb in father’s garden, some do call it rue,
It causes girls in autumn time to have a laugh at you.
Oh, my mother’s got a pretty flower, she calls it Marigold,
And if you will not when you may, you shall not when you would.”

Chorus